Posts Tagged ‘Revolutionary War’

Tryon’s Ferry II

February 13, 2009


William Tryon (1729-1788) was Royal Governor of North Carolina from 1765 to 1771, and served as the last Royal Governor of New York.  A professional soldier, he was appointed Lieutenant Governor of North Carolina in 1764, and upon Arthur Dobbs’s death the next year he became Governor.  In 1757 he married Margaret Wake, a London heiress.  He rigidly obeyed the instructions of his superiors and rigorously enforced the dictates of the British government.  He made New Bern the provincial capital, and built there one of the finest governmental seats in the colonies– later called derisively, Tryon’s Palace.

Tryon inherited a province where settlers in the west were becoming progressively dissatisfied with the local officials appointed by the royal government.  Politicians from the numerous yet sparsely-settled eastern counties dominated the few large western counties where the population was booming. Local sheriffs supported by judges appointed by the provincial government had complete control over the “backcountry” regions. Many of the administrative officers appeared motivated solely by their own personal profit, and the entire system was believed to be corrupt. The effort to eliminate this system of government became known as the War of The Regulation, and opposition to the Royal Governor’s administration became known as the Regulators.

Present-day Randolph County was then roughly the western half of Orange County (now eastern Randolph) and eastern Rowan County (now west of Asheboro).  The Sandy Creek community was the home of the most active Regulators, including James Hunter, Benjamin Merrill, Peter Craven, Rednap Howell and Herman Husband.   The Holly Spring community was home to others such as Herman Cox and William Moffitt.  The creation of Guilford County in 1771 (including the area set off as Randolph in 1779 and Rockingham in 1785) was a political strategy to separate “the main Body of the Insurgents” from the rest of Orange and Rowan counties.

In June, 1768 a committee of Regulators met at Thomas Cox’s Mill (on Millstone Creek, downstream about 200 feet from the present Raymond Cox Mill near Buffalo Ford) to demand redress from the government.. At their request James Hunter and Rednap Howell journeyed to Wilmington, met with Governor Tryon, and presented the grievances of the backcountry. Tryon and the Royal Council summarily rejected the various petitions of the Regulators, and demanded that the inhabitants obey the law and pay their taxes. That summer Tryon took a personal tour of the backcountry, listening to the grievances of unhappy settlers but more importantly testing the loyalty of the county militias. (He scheduled musters of the local troops in Orange, Rowan and Mecklenburg counties, where he summoned the men to take the Royal Standard in place of their county flags.) Tryon left Hillsborough on August 17th and arrived in Salisbury late on the 18th—an extremely fast trip on horseback. His return trip was more impressive: the Governor, at the head of the Mecklenburg and Rowan militias, marched as one brigade through the heart of Regulator country on his way to Hillsborough. Tryon spent the night of Friday September 16th at “Deep River Camp,” with no note of how he crossed the river. His show of force overawed the disgruntled backcountry settlers, and put off the shooting war for three more years.


The long-delayed battle finally happened on May 16, 1771, and took 2 hours.  The disorganized Regulators lost to the professional soldier, and Tryon took as many of the ring-leaders prisoner as he could catch. After the battle Tryon and his army moved west, taking a southern route toward the Wachovia Settlement.

They apparently followed the trading path southwest to arrive on May 21st at the plantation of James Hunter on the upper reaches of Sandy Creek, where they burned his house and barns. (Hunter was the husband of Mary Walker, daughter of Samuel Walker, owner of Walker’s Mill)

That same afternoon they arrived at the property of Hermon Husband, who lived on Sandy Creek west of what is now Liberty. Governor Tryon stayed at Husband’s for a week, before leaving and burning everything.

While at the Husband plantation Tryon issued numerous orders, such as one proclaiming that Husband, James Hunter, William Butler and Rednap Howell were to be considered ‘Outlaws,’ meaning they could be shot on sight (Regulator Papers, p. 473).  Part of the delay was due to bad weather, but a larger part were the large numbers of residents crowding into the Governor’s camp to take advantage of his offer of pardon.

On May 26, Tryon wrote to General Hugh Waddell, then camped near the Yadkin, saying “As most of the Inhabitants on the North side of Deep River and many on the South side, in the whole amounting to above thirteen hundred have come into Camp and Submitted themselves to Government… I am to require you to join me as soon as possible with the Forces under your Command at the upper Ford of Deep River, where the Trading Path crosses.” (Regulator Papers, p. 468).

At the same time he sent the Orange Corps down the Peedee/ Crawford Rd. to Harmon Cox’s, where they requisitioned supplies from the Deep River/ Richland Creek Quaker settlements (Regulator Papers, p. 467).  That Corps then marched northwest up the Cape Fear Road (the road which went from Cross Creek toward Salem- the later Plank Road) while Tryon sent an advance party southwest down the Trading Path.

Sunday May 26th found the advance party (“the Rangers”) stopped 2 miles from Deep River by flooded Pole Cat Creek; they made a miserable camp the next two days through heavy rain with nothing to shelter them but tree limbs and bark.

On Wednesday May 29th the army crossed Pole Cat by felling a large log and walking Indian file, taking 5 hours. They camped that night on the northwest bank of Deep River, which was also flooded.  Evidently their bivoack was at the “upper” or Trading Path ford referred to in Tryon’s order (I am assuming the “lower” ford would be Island Ford where the Crawford/ Pee Dee Road crossed).

On the morning of the 30th the army crossed Deep River and moved to camp at “Kaiway” (Caraway). The order book is silent as to how they crossed the Deep, noting only that “The Waggoners to Harness their Horses at break of Day and cross the River immediately after.”

The next day they crossed the Uwharrie “at the ford” and marched to Flat Swamp (now Davidson County) where Tryon’s forces met up with General Waddell’s troops before moving north to Salem.

A busy May in Randolph, 1771—but no definitive evidence on the origin of the name “Tryon’s Ferry.”

My inference, however, is that some kind of ferriage was required to cross Deep River that day in its flood stage, if not for the majority of the army, at least for its wagons of supplies and its artillery. And perhaps, for the Governor of the Province of North Carolina and the Commander in Chief of the King’s Royal Army in Those Parts.

On June 30, 1771, barely a month after he crossed Deep River one way or another, Governor William Tryon departed North Carolina for his new job as Governor of New York.

[NOTE ON SOURCES:  the 1971 NC Department of Archives and History publication “The Regulators in North Carolina: A Documentary History, 1759-1776” (compiled and edited by William S. Powell, James K. Hunta and Thomas J. Farnham) is the source for all of the quotes, dates and transcripts of Tryon and the Regulators given here.  Sadly, no portrait of Gov. Tryon is known; one that was traditionally thought to be him has been shown to be an officer of another regiment.]

BATTLE AT THE MOUTH OF SANDY CREEK

January 19, 2009
The mouth of Sandy Creek where it meets Deep River.

The mouth of Sandy Creek where it meets Deep River.

Though the American army under Baron DeKalb camped for weeks at Buffalo Ford in the summer of 1780 on its way to Camden, and Lord Cornwallis in 1781 spent several days after the Battle of Guilford Courthouse at Bell’s Mill on Deep River, by and large the official history of the Revolutionary War bypassed Randolph County. Far more active and far more destructive was the guerrilla war which took place in the county between neighbors of opposite political persuasions.

Some extensive military operations were mounted at various times after Guilford Courthouse in an attempt to stop the depredations of the British Loyalist troops. Although little documentary evidence exists concerning the details of the battles with the Tories, it appears that one of the major skirmishes took place in July 1781 at the mouth of Sandy Creek, where several roads crossed at a ford across Deep River.

In the 1980s, Randolph County historian Barbara Newsome Grigg discovered the only records of this battle, contained in pension applications in the National Archives. In June 1832 Congress had passed a bill authorizing pensions for any surviving veterans who could provide proof of Revolutionary War service. All over the country aged vets made their way to county courthouses where they could be deposed by local judges and provide the sworn statements required by Congress. None of the three veterans who recount battling the Tories in Randolph County even lived in the county when they made their statements. All were recounting events from more than 50 years before, so details are sketchy.

For the fully transcribed pension applications of each man, see my entries for November 11, 12, and 13th, 2008.

Henry Morgan (born in 1758 in what is now Randolph County) fought with the state militia from 1779 to 1781. James Morgan was born in Maryland in 1760 but soon moved to the area and first volunteered for service in 1781 in Randolph (his relationship to Henry Morgan is not yet clear). Edward Beeson was in 1834 unclear even about his own birthday (estimated to have been in 1756), and thought he entered military service about the year 1778 in Randolph.

Henry Morgan provides the most detail about the area’s primary battle with the Tories, and even names it “the Battle at the Mouth of Sandy Creek.” James Morgan provides only a brief outline of events. Edward Beeson is very shaky on dates and places, but very good about names and people.

Henry Morgan served with the Randolph Light Horse, under the command of Col. John Paisley, Major John Nalls and Lt. William York. James Morgan was in the Randolph militia under General Butler, Col. John Collier, Captain John Hines and Lt. William York. Beeson, who was apparently in a different unit (“a Company of Foot in the Randolph regiment of militia”), was under the command of General Butler, Colonel Thomas Dougan, Major Robert McCanna, Lt. James Woods, Captain David Brower, and Sergeant William Brown. Beeson served the company as “Ensign”.


Their individual accounts of the summer of 1781 are as follows:

In 1781 Henry Morgan was “engaged in dispersing the tories wherever collected; that he was in three battles, one in July 1781 at the mouth of Sandy Creek in which we & Lieutenant William York of our company were wounded and three men David Brewer [Brower], David McMasters & Joel Benje were killed, & in August after or September we had another battle at Linleys mill in which the tories were defeated, Major John Nalls was killed here & four or five others.” [The third battle was apparently later that summer near Wilmington.]

James Morgan “was called out by Colonel Collier and placed under Captain John Hines & Lieutenant William York and marched down to Chatham county after the enemy, and says at this time he was sent out against a party of Tories and had an engagement with them, and was defeated with the loss of three men killed and two wounded among the latter was his Lieutenant William York, and says they took a good many prisoners during the time he was out in this tour. But how long he was out he cannot say precise, but believes it was seven weeks, or more.–“

Edward Beeson says “Their objective was the destruction of the Tories. Next day, after they left Johnstonville, their place of rendezvous, their Captain and three men were killed by the Tories who waylaid them. The Tories were commanded by Major Rainey, and fired on them from a steep hill on the side of Brush [Sandy?] Creek. After Brower was killed, Woods became Captain and this deponent became Lieutenant. They pursued the Tories about forty miles to Fork Creek and there besieged them in a house belonging to one John Needham. In the morning before they got to Needham’s, their Colonel (Dougan) joined them.

“This deponent was ordered with half of his company to attack the back of the house under the concealment of an orchard, while the rest were to attack in front. This deponent’s company were the first who took possession of the same, those in front having feigned a retreat to draw out the Tories, which accordingly succeeded. Twenty-one were killed, seven at the house, and fourteen at the place where they kept the horses, the Tories having fled there, to where they were concealed on the bank of a Deep River, where Colonel Dougan had himself gone with a detachment, to surprise them if they should be driven from the house.

“They then marched down to… the Brown Marsh near Wilmington, where they again had a battle with the Tories on open ground. They there again defeated them, who being reinforced by the British from their shipping at Fort Johnson, returned and defeated us in return.”


Their combined account of events can be assembled as follows:

After the battle of Guilford Courthouse in March, 1781, the local militia forces in Randolph County were engaged in fighting local Tories. In July, while moving from Johnstonville towards Chatham County, the Whig forces were ambushed at or near the mouth of Sandy Creek where it enters Deep River. Tory forces, perhaps under the command of “Major Rainey” (Raines?) “fired on them from at steep hill on the side” of the creek (the western side of Sandy Creek is a bluff fifty to seventy feet above the water level). Three Whigs were killed, and several wounded. In the Morgan’s company, Henry Morgan and his lieutenant William York were wounded; in Beeson’s company, his Captain David Brower was killed. Henry Morgan says that the others killed were David McMasters and Joel Benje.

If Beeson can be trusted, the Battle at the Mouth of Sandy Creek was followed by another battle on Fork Creek within a day or two (he says it occurred 40 miles away, which would have taken at least a whole day to ride on horseback) which killed 21 Tories and captured a number of prisoners.

This piecemeal account, while historically threadbare, can actually be confirmed by Rev. Eli W. Caruthers, our primary source for Piedmont North Carolina’s Revolutionary War history. More on that later.

Colonel David Fanning and the Piedmont Guerrilla War

January 13, 2009
Clay stove tiles excavated in 1976 from the Mt. Shepherd Pottery.

Clay stove tiles excavated in 1976 from the Mt. Shepherd Pottery.

Piedmont North Carolina during the Revolution and again during the War Between the States experienced chaos and a complete breakdown of civil order which is hard to imagine from our 21st century perspective.

The situation here in the early 1780s and 1860s can only be compared to the late 20th-century Yugoslavia or Somalia, where government and civil order collapsed in the face of personal, political and religious anarchy.

Taking a political stand then literally meant risking one’s life and property, and being willing to die for making a personal choice. We’re unaware of the enormity of our own history because the passage of time has healed these private and family grievances. In other parts of the world- Ireland, Palestine, India/Pakistan—history never seems to end, and old wounds still fester.

Historical amnesia also occurs without any kind of permanent record—without letters, diaries, memoirs, journalism of some sort- no full account of history is possible. Systematic collection of oral history is a process that only began with the New Deal’s WPA Writer’s Projects, where intellectuals were paid to investigate and record the history of the uneducated and illiterate.

In NC, the closet containing the historical record of the Revolutionary War is not bare, but what we have gives a distorted picture. In an inversion of the aphorism that ‘history is the story written by the winners,’ the Revolutionary history of the Piedmont is primarily known from the extensive written account of one of its biggest losers.

Colonel David Fanning (1754-1825) was born in Johnston County, NC. He ran away from an apprenticeship circa 1772, and ended up in Laurens District, SC, living among the Catawba Indians. After being mistreated (in effect, mugged) by a group of pro-Whig supporters, Fanning became virulently anti-Whig/ pro-Tory. After May, 1780, he became a companion and deputy of South Carolina’s Tory guerrilla leader “Bloody Bill” Cunningham. Fanning moved back to North Carolina just before the battle of Guilford Courthouse, and assembled a body of guerrillas who terrorized the Whigs of central NC from a base near Cox’s Mill on Deep River near Buffalo Ford. With the defeat of Cornwallis at Yorktown and the withdrawal of the British from Charleston, Fanning fled to Florida, and finally to Canada, where he lived until his death in 1825.

Fanning’s career in the Piedmont had first been examined by Wheeler in his History of North Carolina, published in 1851, and by the Rev. Eli W. Carruthers of Guilford County, who in 1854 published one of the first local history books, The Revolutionary Incidents and Sketches of Character, chiefly in the old North State. But the earliest accounts of Colonel Fanning’s exploits in Randolph County are letters written from General Alexander Gray of Trinity to Dr. Archibald Henderson of the University of North Carolina, dated March 30th, 1847. The existence of Fanning’s own handwritten manuscript memoir (evidently penned before June, 1790, according Fanning’s date in the preface) was unknown to scholars until it was copied by a researcher from the Massachusetts Historical Society. Even that copy was barely known until it came into the hands of prominent early American historian George Bancroft, who allowed North Carolina historian John H. Wheeler to publish it, with annotations by former Governor L.D. Swaim, in 1861. (see Wheeler’s Introduction to Fanning’s Narrative). Since that time it has been republished several times, and has become the standard outline of our knowledge of the Whig-Tory guerrilla war that took place in North Carolina in 1781-82.

One of the most memorable local incidents was the ambush and murder of Andrew Balfour, colonel of the local Whig Militia. Fanning confirms this in detail. Another was his guerrilla raid on northwest Randolph, attacking the courthouse in broad daylight, assassinating several Whig leaders, and burning the homes and barns of numerous Whig families. This was confirmed by local interviews conducted by Dr. Carruthers.

Another significant local event mentioned by Fanning’s Narrative is the escape of Andrew Hunter on Fanning’s stolen mare, Fanning mentions it in his memoir; the earliest printed newspaper accounts of Fanning’s exploits speak of the event, and it is known in a variety of forms dating back to stories collected by Judge Archibald DeBow Murphey.

The Whig and Tory war during the Revolution in North Carolina cries out for additional scholarship. Piecing it together won’t be easy. But every newly-discovered document reveals unknown events and details. Perhaps the most surprising unknown story is the Battle at the Mouth of Sandy Creek, in July 1781. Information about this battle was first discovered by local historian Barbara Newsome Grigg while researching 19th-century pension applications. The three Revolutionary veterans who mention the battle put it on a par with the much-better-known Battle of Lindley’s Mill in Alamance County. Another area of local interest needing further research is the Quaker community and grist mills surrounding Buffalo Ford, from the summer of 1780, when the Continental Army until the command of Baron DeKalb was bivouacked there awaiting its new commander General Gates, to 1781 and 1782, when Fanning made his headquarters there and controlled much of the Piedmont.

Revolutionary Soldier JAMES MORGAN

November 12, 2008

Some extensive military operations were mounted at various times after Guilford Courthouse in an attempt to stop the depredations of the British Loyalist troops commanded by Colonel David Fanning. Although little documentary evidence exists concerning the details of the battles with the Tories, it appears that one of the major skirmishes took place in July 1781 at the mouth of Sandy Creek, where several roads crossed at a ford across Deep River. The only record of this battle survives in three applications for federal pensions made by elderly veterans more than fifty years afterwards. Randolph County historian Barbara Newsome Grigg discovered them in the National Archives in the mid-1980s. I’m transcribing these pension applications and publishing each separately, and I’ll write about the battle later.

JAMES MORGAN    (Pension # S.7251)

(born 26 Apr. 1760 @ Baltimore, MD; pension granted in Yancey County, NC, in 1834 when he was 74 years old)

Declaration in order to obtain the benefit of the Act of Congress of the 7th of June 1832–

State of North Carolina

County of Yancey

On this 20th day of October 1834 personally appeared before the court of pleas and quarter session the Reverend James Morgan a resident of the county of Yancey and State of North Carolina aged 74 years who being first duly sworn according to law, doth on his oath make the following declaration in order to obtain the act of Congress passed June the 7th 1832. That he entered the army of the United States as a volunteer in the spring of the year 1781 in Randolph county in North Carolina where he was living at that time.

That he was called out by Colonel Collier and placed under Captain John Hines & Lieutenant William York and marched down to Chatham county after the enemy, and says at this time he was sent out against a party of Tories and had an engagement with them, and was defeated with the loss of three men killed and two wounded among the latter was his Lieutenant William York, and says they took a good many prisoners during the time he was out in this tour. But how long he was out he cannot say precise, but believes it was seven weeks, or more.–

Some short time after he was discharged, colonel Collier give orders to raise another company in Randolph county to suppress the Tories. This was about the latter part summer or the beginning of fall in the same year 1781 when he substituted for three months for which he got a horse– but not having any acquaintance with the man for whom he substituted he cannot recollect his name at this time– and says he was placed under the command of captain Thomas Dougan and lieutenant William Cray– that they marched from Randolph county through Chatham Orange and Moore counties but had no battle with the enemy but took a number of straggling tories prisoners and brought them in and says his officers acted under General Butler and says after the expiration of this tour he went to live in Guilford county in N.C. and in the year of 1782 colonel Paisly gave orders to raise men to suppress the Tories who were collecting in large numbers in the lower end of Randolph county and the counties adjoining–

That he volunteered under Captain Daniel Gillespie and lieutenant George Sparks and commanded then by colonel John Paisley and Major John Gillespie that he served under these officers seven weeks and two days before he was discharged that they were marched twice through Randolph and Chatham counties during this term of service but had no engagement—and says that in all his tours he served as a private– and says from the best information he can get he was born in Baltimore county in the state of Maryland on the 26th day of April 1760– that his parents brought him to North Carolina where he was raised and was living when he entered the service and continued to live after peace was concluded until he was upwards of forty years of age—

Since that time he has lived in different parts of the county– that is in South Carolina and different parts of the western country and last before he dame into this county in Ashe county in this state until a few months ago he came to live in this county. That he has followed teaching school and preaching & travelling for many years—and says that this is the first time he has ever made application to be put on the pension roll of the United States or any other state because he could not get anyone to prepare a declaration for him– and says he does not know that he can find any living witness at this time by whom he can prove his services– He hereby relinquishes every claim to whatever pension or annuity except the present and he declares that his name is not on the pension roll of any agency or state– Sworn to and subscribed the day and year aforesaid

James Morgan

Revolutionary Soldier HENRY MORGAN

November 11, 2008

Some extensive military operations were mounted at various times after Guilford Courthouse in an attempt to stop the depredations of the British Loyalist troops commanded by Colonel David Fanning. Although little documentary evidence exists concerning the details of the battles with the Tories, it appears that one of the major skirmishes took place in July 1781 at the mouth of Sandy Creek, where several roads crossed at a ford across Deep River. The only record of this battle survives in three applications for federal pensions made by elderly veterans more than fifty years afterwards. Randolph County historian Barbara Newsome Grigg discovered them in the National Archives in the mid-1980s. I’m transcribing these pension applications and publishing each separately, and I’ll write about the battle later.

HENRY MORGAN (Pension #W.3709)-

(born 7 Dec. 1758 in Rowan County, NC; died 22 Feb. 1849 in White Co. Ill.)

Declaration in order to obtain the benefit of the act of Congress passed June 7, 1832.

State of Illinois

White County

On this fourth day of September 1832, personally appeared in open Court before the Hon. William Wilson Judge of the White Circuit Court being a court of record now sitting, Henry Morgan, a resident of said County of White and State Illinois aged 73 years, who being first duly sworn according to law doth on his oath make the following declaration, in order to obtain the benefit of the act of congress passed June 7 1832.

That he entered the service of the United States in the militia under the following named officers and served as herein stated: Colonel John Collier, Lt. Col. Thomas Dugan, Major Anthony Sharpe, Capt. Robert McLane, Lieutenant William York. That he resided in Guilford Co. North Carolina and was drafted for five months and mustered into service on the 24th of March 1779. That he marched from Guilford Co. to Charleston in South Carolina, that on his way to Charleston he meet with a regiment of Tories at Kings Creek about 600 as was then supposed, that they were attacked and defeated a few prisoners were taken and 3 or 4 killed. That he remained at Charleston until the 24th of August when he was discharged & returned home, his discharge was signed by Captain Robert McLane.

That under Col. William Campbell, Major John Brysan, Capt. Flower Swift, Lieutenant Alexander Bryson he entered the militia as a volunteer in August 1780, that he then resided in Montgomery County Virginia and marched from there to the Yadkin river near the shallow ford where there was a battle with the tories, that 6 or 7 of them were killed and a number taken prisoners that he was discharged verbally to wait further orders in one month & returned home.

That under the same Col., Major Alexander and Captain McAdo, he entered the service as a volunteer on or about the first of February 1781, & marched to join Gen. Greene then below Guilford Courthouse. That when the regiment arrived at Whitesills mills on the Seder fork it was attacked by the enemy and defeated and our Colonel killed, that our regiment was totally disbanded at this time. That he then went to Randolph light horse that he then volunteered for the whole war. That Col. Pacely [Paisley] was commander of the regiment but not out in service, Major John Nails was in command. That he was then engaged in dispersing the tories wherever collected, that he was in three battles, one in July 1781 at the mouth of Sandy Creek in which we & Lieutenant William York of our company were wounded and three men David Brewer, David McMasters & Joel Benje were killed, & in August after or September we had another battle at Linleys mill in which the tories were defeated, Major John Nalls was killed here & four or five others.

That after the battle at Linleys mill he went down towards Wilmington taking what tories could be found. That he was then engaged in riding through the counties of Randolph, Chatham, Moore, Anson and a county on the Pedee name not recollected. That he continued in the service until the following Spring in April when the Captain with whom he and volunteered for the war placed him in the State troops under Major Joel Lewis, Captain Tabb, Lieutenant Christmas and that he continued in the same duty until the next October when he received from Captain R. McLane a discharge stating the time he had served &c.– That he has no documentary evidence & knows no person whose testimony he can procure to testify this service.

That he was born in Rowan or Guilford County in North Carolina on the 7th. of December 1758, has no record of his age. Living when first called into service in Guilford Co. N.C. when he entered the service after that in Montgomery Co. Va. That he resided there 16 years after his discharge then returned to Granger County, Ten., resided there 11 years, then to Warren county Kentucky resided there 4 years, then to Logan county same state, resided 5 years & then removed to this County where he has since resided. That his discharges were burnt about one year after the close of the war while he resided in Virginia. That there were no regular officer with him except while at Charleston & has no recollection of the names of any of the regiments stationed there. Thos. J.B. Brockett & Peter Miller Jr. are persons in his neighborhood to whom he is known & can testify as to his character for veracity, and their belief or his service as a soldier of the revolution.

He hereby relinquishes every claim whatever to a pension or annuity except the present, and declares that his name is not on the pension roll of the agency of any state.

Henry Morgan, his x mark

State of Illinois

White County

Before the undersigned clerk of the circuit court in and for the said county this day personally appeared Susan Morgan, aged 54 years, who being duly sworn says that the family record of Susan & Henry Morgan has for the space of 35 or 40 years been in the possession of herself as well as other members of the family and that the strip of Paper hereto attached was in the presents and sight of said Deponent cut from the said family Bible or family Record that the same has been since the recollection of said Deponent in and attached to the said family Record that said Deponent does not know or recollect who wrote the same or in whose hand writing it is But that said deponent does verily believe the same to be genuine and correct– that the said Henry Morgan and Susan Morgan have since the recollection of said deponent lived together as man and wife– that they were so known and esteemed in the neighborhoods where they have resided and further deponent says not.

Susan Morgan, her x mark

attached: Henry Morgan and Susanna Poe were married in September 1785—In Montgomery County Virginia by a Minister named Wm. Porter.

State of Illinois

White County

On this 3d. day of October 1851 personally appeared Susan Morgan a resident of the County and State aforesaid, aged somewhere about 86 years who being duly sworn before the undersigned County Judge for the County of White doth on her oath make the following declaration in order to obtain the benefit of the provisions made by the Act of Congress passed 29th July 1848. Said Susan Morgan being the widow of Henry Morgan who as deponent thinks was a private during a part at least of the Revolutionary War, deponent thinks that her said husband, was a part of the time under the command of Captain McClain and another part of the time under the Command of Captain Campbell and again as she thinks under the command of Capt. McClain. Deponent thinks that a part of the time the said Henry Morgan belonged to the light horse men. She does not recollect the name or names of the higher officers But she further declares that the said Henry Morgan was for many years before his death a revolutionary Pensioner.

She further declares that she was married to the said Henry Morgan sometime in the year 1785 in the County of Montgomery in the state of Virginia by a man of the name as she thinks of Porter who she thinks was a Minister of the Gospel that the aforesaid Henry Morgan died on the 22d. day of February 1849, that she was not married to him prior to his leaving the service But that the marriage took place previous to the Second of January Eighteen Hundred (Viz) at the time above stated. She further swears that she is now a widow and that she has never before made any application for a pension and that she is still a widow.

Susan Morgan, her x mark

Sworn to and subscribed before me this 3d day of October AD 1851

Solomon Vories, county judge